Good morning! I have a been with OM for awhile now and am aware of the awesome changes that are occurring. But those same changes have sparked questions about the new process as my last few posts were not published and I think I've fallen out of the loop.
Is the editing process the same? Don't we just click the edit button and edit the article ourselves? Some of the posts I've read are editing requests indicating the need for someone else to make these changes. These post have confused me. Aren't the changes we make ourselves being recognized?

Also, I noticed there is a new media option. Are we now able to add images to our blog pieces? Should we?

I have a new piece I'm working on for October and hope to be on board enough with the new process not to be left out again. 

Thank you,

Lorri

Views: 158

Replies to This Discussion

Hi Lorri,

 You are not been left out.

 We are working with at least a month ahead.  Up to date, We have already articles scheduled until January. We are giving priority to our writers. The routine is 44/55 articles to go to the Multimedia editions, depending on the month (some months have 5 weekends), but the rule of thumb is 11 articles on the multimedia a week.

We do have also a routine to get 4 to 5 articles a day posted on the website daily.As you are a spotlight writer, your articles tend to be automatically selected to the multimedia editions.

What I asked, if possible was to the writers delineate what are your tag words, for instance, if you have an article about reiki healing, the tags could be : healing, alternative,reiki, energetic healing.

Because we are working with professionals that are not always specialized with each field of the conscious/spiritual/ metaphysical community, we would like to streamline better and allow you to determine what category your article will be placed once we are expanding the categories inside of the multimedia, the wonders of specialization.

 Mostly,  Trevor and Kathy and Marina are the ones that oversee the final editing aspects. 

Thank you for your reply. I didn't realize you were working so far ahead. The new article I'm working on is about burial practices and honoring the dead. Right now its the barest of bones but I would like to hit upon how our society looks at death as an inconvenience to be quickly dealt with and forgotten and then bring in rites of the past and how important they were to not only the individual but the entire community. I want to tie it into the season with festivals of the dead, pointing out how in October the veil grows thinner allowing interaction between the worlds. Is it too late to add to the October issue? 

Just curious. I will still post it either way when it is ready. 

Humanity Healing said:

Hi Lorri,

 You are not been left out.

 We are working with at least a month ahead.  Up to date, We have already articles scheduled until January. We are giving priority to our writers. The routine is 44/55 articles to go to the Multimedia editions, depending on the month (some months have 5 weekends), but the rule of thumb is 11 articles on the multimedia a week.

We do have also a routine to get 4 to 5 articles a day posted on the website daily.As you are a spotlight writer, your articles tend to be automatically selected to the multimedia editions.

What I asked, if possible was to the writers delineate what are your tag words, for instance, if you have an article about reiki healing, the tags could be : healing, alternative,reiki, energetic healing.

Because we are working with professionals that are not always specialized with each field of the conscious/spiritual/ metaphysical community, we would like to streamline better and allow you to determine what category your article will be placed once we are expanding the categories inside of the multimedia, the wonders of specialization.

 Mostly,  Trevor and Kathy and Marina are the ones that oversee the final editing aspects. 

Dearest Trevor, I pray you are having a wonderful time in your role as our leader and editor. I so appreciate your kind and gentle spirit that shines through in all your correspondence with our little group of angel hearts that have chosen each an assignment, to make this planet a better place for everyone. I see it in all the articles, and the people that are involved in OM Times efforts, (one of uplifting humanity). I am so thrilled to be a part of this effort. Thank You. I wanted to run this by you for your opinion. I had two topics on my heart this week, the sacredness of water, and third gender. The water article is coming, OK. Much Love

THE SACRED THIRD GENDER

 

Centuries before colonization a sacred and unique people existed within the villages and communities of the indigenous cultures around the world.  Along with male and female there was an additional person living within the community, a third gender.  Known in India as hijra, chakka, khusra, Aravani/Aruvnii; Southern Africa knew them as chibudi, /chibanda, gangas; the South Pacific they are called mahu, on the Island of Hispaniola they were known as guevedoche.  Descriptions of third-gender beliefs can be found throughout the region of South America as well, particularly within the Aztec and Mayan cultures. It is recorded that third gender natives especially honored Xochiquetzal, the Aztec goddess of spring and sexuality, and were known as patlacheh.  Recorded in thirteen-century Cuba were large groups of people labeled effeminate, who took part in many aspects of the Cuban culture.    In North America male and female “Two Spirits” have been documented in over 130 tribes.  Known as neither male nor female they held a high status leading the communities in conducting marriage rites, rites of passage and death ceremonies. In some cultures they were called high priestess, powerful wizards, and medicine people.  Also seen in the community in the role of teacher and healers as in the following examples from several North American tribes.

 

special role players in the Sun Dance (Crow, Hidatsa, Oglala Lakota)

 

     The reason for this acceptance within the community was based on the fact that the indigenous people did not have within their culture a learned bias regarding gender.   What we now call intersex people, hermaphrodites, and those that had bodies that did not conform to male or female were considered special people “blessed” by the Creator.  Most appeared neither exclusively male nor female however many time noticeably both.

     Those who were born with both female and male genitalia were considered a sacred being, protected by the village especially in time of warring.  They were not considered different, but they were accepted as an addition to the culture, and community, thus a third gender. Gender and sex is not the same thing.  Gender is the role you play along with your contribution within your community, and family. This was the understanding of the indigenous culture regarding intersex people.

 

     Early on in the development and behavior of these children their uniqueness was noticed and nurtured.   If a boy did not want to hunt with his father or the other men, but wanted to stay behind with the women it was simply accepted.  Also if a girl did not want to stay behind but choose to go to hunt or battle, the men invited her to go with them.   This was not an embarrassment for the parents, even when the boy wanted to dress like a woman, or the opposite for a girl who dressed like a warrior. Being designated a “Two Spirit” within the village was an honor, and usually meant the child was educated and trained with the medicine people.  This designation also gave the child higher status within the society.  

    If they played such an important role in these communities the question is not that they existed but why were they targeted for discrimination, stereotyping, and for most often death during and following colonization?  You must only look to the history of the church and Christianity for its role in destroying a sacred group of people on the planet. 

     Most all the indigenous cultures of the world accepted third gender and welcomed it as a positive addition to their communities.  Christian dominance and authority began enforcing strict rules and systems that set gender standards leaving little room for third gender people on the planet and their very existence threatened for centuries.  Faced with ridicule, abandonment, persecution, imprisonment and even death they began to go underground, unable to freely be who they were born to be.  

 

THE AWAKENING BEGINS

A Supreme Court decision in Nepal added a “third gender” category to national census surveys and citizenship documents, announced by the United Nations Development Program in 2007.  The action was seen around the world as a positive step for human rights, designating Nepal as a pioneer in equality for a minority disadvantaged group. Recognized as precedence in South Asia for the struggle of a better future for people who have been forced into unemployment, prostitution, and panhandling for livelihood. Many were denied educational opportunities based on their “difference”. Nepal has become “AWARE” of new ideas attitudes, and respect towards this most misunderstood gender. 

     Germany leads Europe in legalizing “third gender” by an announcement that was made just recently.  Legally a German doctor may not designate a child who is born indeterminable because of certain physical conditions. In the past such children were generally labeled a boy by medical staff.  It can be years later according to physical development, about the time of puberty, questions surface about their gender role.  For many it was obvious at a much earlier age, as the child expressed disappointment in the gender that was assigned to them.

The new legislation also means that babies who are born without gender-defining physical characteristics can be registered as having an undetermined or unspecific gender on their birth certificate.  The new law aims to remove discrimination against intersex people, a category that includes those born with both male and female genitalia, formerly known as hermaphrodites, and those affected by medical conditions that mean their bodies do no conform to a male or female standard. Pilgrim, Sophie (2013) Connect with France 24.   The European Commission in 2011, described intersex person as different, not gender status, but a biological makeup; genetic, hormonal, and physical features which cause them to be neither exclusively male nor female but is typical of both at once or not clearly defined as either.  

This decision in Germany is a major break through for all intersex people throughout the world regarding their rights of equality.

 

 The first people, and the indigenous cultures lived harmoniously with the third gender, nature, and the Universe.  What was “above and what was below” are also considered sacred directions; therefore there are not just four. A great enlightenment has been happening according to indigenous prophecies concerning the return of harmony and a “thousand years of peace”, that is coming to our planet.  Many connect this to the Spirit of Jesus and the return of the prophet of love. The Cherokee have a prophesy about the “Pale One” that will return and bring harmony, some think they are also referring to the Spirit of Jesus.  This time of peace is coming because of reincarnation, all the great masters, and goddess are reincarnating at this time.  We are they, the ones that have arrived again, and are  ‘Aware’.  We are the ones who understand the sacredness of nature, the stars, and the sacredness of all people.   The old paradigms, and systems that persecuted, oppressed and ruled the inhabitants of Earth, by fear, will pass away.  We humanity are a living pendulum swinging back to our original understanding and connection with the Creator.  The Soul remembers, and never dies as recorded by all cultures.  Our soul is celebrated, anticipated, and reincarnated into a new body, one that brings with it a thousand years, or more of lifetimes. Humanity is going to save themselves regardless of the forces of evil that ruled this world for eons. Earth will survive, give her enough time and she will clear her waters of the poison that industries have poured into her lakes and stream, her plants and trees will rejuvenate, and her sacred creatures will thrive again.  There has always been a Divine Plan for our planet from the Supreme Creator, a plan that included the welfare of all of us, male, female, third, fourth, or twenty gender. 

Thank you for your Kind Words Nancy - I have scheduled 'The sacred third gender' as one of the articles I will be working on tomorrow.
 
Nancy Oakes said:

Dearest Trevor, I pray you are having a wonderful time in your role as our leader and editor. I so appreciate your kind and gentle spirit that shines through in all your correspondence with our little group of angel hearts that have chosen each an assignment, to make this planet a better place for everyone. I see it in all the articles, and the people that are involved in OM Times efforts, (one of uplifting humanity). I am so thrilled to be a part of this effort. Thank You. I wanted to run this by you for your opinion. I had two topics on my heart this week, the sacredness of water, and third gender. The water article is coming, OK. Much Love

THE SACRED THIRD GENDER

 

Centuries before colonization a sacred and unique people existed within the villages and communities of the indigenous cultures around the world.  Along with male and female there was an additional person living within the community, a third gender.  Known in India as hijra, chakka, khusra, Aravani/Aruvnii; Southern Africa knew them as chibudi, /chibanda, gangas; the South Pacific they are called mahu, on the Island of Hispaniola they were known as guevedoche.  Descriptions of third-gender beliefs can be found throughout the region of South America as well, particularly within the Aztec and Mayan cultures. It is recorded that third gender natives especially honored Xochiquetzal, the Aztec goddess of spring and sexuality, and were known as patlacheh.  Recorded in thirteen-century Cuba were large groups of people labeled effeminate, who took part in many aspects of the Cuban culture.    In North America male and female “Two Spirits” have been documented in over 130 tribes.  Known as neither male nor female they held a high status leading the communities in conducting marriage rites, rites of passage and death ceremonies. In some cultures they were called high priestess, powerful wizards, and medicine people.  Also seen in the community in the role of teacher and healers as in the following examples from several North American tribes.

 

special role players in the Sun Dance (Crow, Hidatsa, Oglala Lakota)

 

     The reason for this acceptance within the community was based on the fact that the indigenous people did not have within their culture a learned bias regarding gender.   What we now call intersex people, hermaphrodites, and those that had bodies that did not conform to male or female were considered special people “blessed” by the Creator.  Most appeared neither exclusively male nor female however many time noticeably both.

     Those who were born with both female and male genitalia were considered a sacred being, protected by the village especially in time of warring.  They were not considered different, but they were accepted as an addition to the culture, and community, thus a third gender. Gender and sex is not the same thing.  Gender is the role you play along with your contribution within your community, and family. This was the understanding of the indigenous culture regarding intersex people.

 

     Early on in the development and behavior of these children their uniqueness was noticed and nurtured.   If a boy did not want to hunt with his father or the other men, but wanted to stay behind with the women it was simply accepted.  Also if a girl did not want to stay behind but choose to go to hunt or battle, the men invited her to go with them.   This was not an embarrassment for the parents, even when the boy wanted to dress like a woman, or the opposite for a girl who dressed like a warrior. Being designated a “Two Spirit” within the village was an honor, and usually meant the child was educated and trained with the medicine people.  This designation also gave the child higher status within the society.  

    If they played such an important role in these communities the question is not that they existed but why were they targeted for discrimination, stereotyping, and for most often death during and following colonization?  You must only look to the history of the church and Christianity for its role in destroying a sacred group of people on the planet. 

     Most all the indigenous cultures of the world accepted third gender and welcomed it as a positive addition to their communities.  Christian dominance and authority began enforcing strict rules and systems that set gender standards leaving little room for third gender people on the planet and their very existence threatened for centuries.  Faced with ridicule, abandonment, persecution, imprisonment and even death they began to go underground, unable to freely be who they were born to be.  

 

THE AWAKENING BEGINS

A Supreme Court decision in Nepal added a “third gender” category to national census surveys and citizenship documents, announced by the United Nations Development Program in 2007.  The action was seen around the world as a positive step for human rights, designating Nepal as a pioneer in equality for a minority disadvantaged group. Recognized as precedence in South Asia for the struggle of a better future for people who have been forced into unemployment, prostitution, and panhandling for livelihood. Many were denied educational opportunities based on their “difference”. Nepal has become “AWARE” of new ideas attitudes, and respect towards this most misunderstood gender. 

     Germany leads Europe in legalizing “third gender” by an announcement that was made just recently.  Legally a German doctor may not designate a child who is born indeterminable because of certain physical conditions. In the past such children were generally labeled a boy by medical staff.  It can be years later according to physical development, about the time of puberty, questions surface about their gender role.  For many it was obvious at a much earlier age, as the child expressed disappointment in the gender that was assigned to them.

The new legislation also means that babies who are born without gender-defining physical characteristics can be registered as having an undetermined or unspecific gender on their birth certificate.  The new law aims to remove discrimination against intersex people, a category that includes those born with both male and female genitalia, formerly known as hermaphrodites, and those affected by medical conditions that mean their bodies do no conform to a male or female standard. Pilgrim, Sophie (2013) Connect with France 24.   The European Commission in 2011, described intersex person as different, not gender status, but a biological makeup; genetic, hormonal, and physical features which cause them to be neither exclusively male nor female but is typical of both at once or not clearly defined as either.  

This decision in Germany is a major break through for all intersex people throughout the world regarding their rights of equality.

 

 The first people, and the indigenous cultures lived harmoniously with the third gender, nature, and the Universe.  What was “above and what was below” are also considered sacred directions; therefore there are not just four. A great enlightenment has been happening according to indigenous prophecies concerning the return of harmony and a “thousand years of peace”, that is coming to our planet.  Many connect this to the Spirit of Jesus and the return of the prophet of love. The Cherokee have a prophesy about the “Pale One” that will return and bring harmony, some think they are also referring to the Spirit of Jesus.  This time of peace is coming because of reincarnation, all the great masters, and goddess are reincarnating at this time.  We are they, the ones that have arrived again, and are  ‘Aware’.  We are the ones who understand the sacredness of nature, the stars, and the sacredness of all people.   The old paradigms, and systems that persecuted, oppressed and ruled the inhabitants of Earth, by fear, will pass away.  We humanity are a living pendulum swinging back to our original understanding and connection with the Creator.  The Soul remembers, and never dies as recorded by all cultures.  Our soul is celebrated, anticipated, and reincarnated into a new body, one that brings with it a thousand years, or more of lifetimes. Humanity is going to save themselves regardless of the forces of evil that ruled this world for eons. Earth will survive, give her enough time and she will clear her waters of the poison that industries have poured into her lakes and stream, her plants and trees will rejuvenate, and her sacred creatures will thrive again.  There has always been a Divine Plan for our planet from the Supreme Creator, a plan that included the welfare of all of us, male, female, third, fourth, or twenty gender. 

Hello Trevor,

I hope you are well. I'm feeling the shift in the energy as the season slips into fall. I have a new season related article. I understand it may be too late for print. I'm posting it here so that you may tweak it however you'd like. I have also have a past Halloween article I liked. You may remember it. It never made it into print or onto the blog.

Thank you,

Lorri

Our Forgotten Dead

Many in our society have become disconnected from their ancestors as our culture offers an appalling lack of framework for relating with our dead. Take yourself for example. When was the last time you visited the grave of a family member? Sure, you went to the funeral, but afterward, did you ever return?  

In the past, ancestor veneration was an important part of life as it was believed by ancient cultures all over the world that the dead lived on and were able to influence the lives of the living. Ancestor spirits were sought for wisdom and guidance and remembered through offerings and sacrifice. Burial mounds, tombs and gravesites were more than just a repository of bones as it was believed that the bones themselves held an energetic link with the soul of the deceased. Burial sites were cared for and honored as they provided an important link with the unseen realms.

Around the world rituals to honor the dead coincided with the changing of the seasons. For many ancient agrarian societies, the beginning of November marked the end of summer when the last of the crops were harvested as all thoughts turned to the cold months ahead. Unlike today where death is more of an inconvenience, the ancients recognized death as a part of life. When the year cooled, wills were drawn up and debts were settled as one never knew whose help they might need to make it through the winter or if they would even live to see another spring.  As the nights lengthened and the earth shifted from fertile to dormant, ancient societies around the world turned their thoughts to those who had died and festivals were held, the world over, commemorating the death of the year. The ancient people who inhabited France and the British isles observed a calendar that began on November first marking the death of the old year and the beginning of the new. At sundown on the last day of the year, October 31st, it was believed that at this time, the veil between the worlds of the living and the dead grew thin allowing for those who had died to pass through and those who were lonely to visit the families they had left behind.

Indeed honoring the Dead with the last harvest of the year has been celebrated around the world under many different names.  In Japan, during the festival of Obon, the souls of the departed return to the world of the living to visit their relatives. As the sun goes down families light paper lanterns and leave offerings of food for the spirits. South Koreans give thanks to their ancestors during a three-day celebration known as Chuseok. While in Nepal we find a festival of cows, or Gaijatra, commemorating those who had died during the year.  In Belgium, Halloween was the night to light candles in memory of dead relatives. In Czechoslovakia, chairs were placed by the fireside on Halloween night for the dead to warm themselves.

Ceremonial breads were baked to honor the dead. In Scotland, the soul cakes were made of oat flour and known as Dirge Loaves, while in Italy, the food of choice for All Souls' celebrations is a cookie called bones of the dead or "Ossi di Morto," In the Americas a belief originating with the Aztecs that the souls of the dead returned to Mexico with the migration of the monarch butterfly each fall, spawned today's popular Día de los Muertos during which sugar skulls and Pan de Muerto or 'bread of the dead' an anise flavored brioche is baked to honor the dead at graveside feasts. Taque Santun Arupa is held in Bolivia , a celebration that dates back to pre-Hispanic times in which families prepared loafs made from quinoa flour to coax the dead into visiting the living.

These days of the dead were festive and bright. They were filled with lots of good food and loving memories. For most of modern society the role of ancestor has shifted from loving guardian, to troubled ghost representing past and buried troubles that must be overcome. Instead of offerings, blame is laid at their feet in closed-door sessions treating current abusive behaviors, family pain and even alcoholism. But it doesn’t have to be this way. We can change the way we feel and how we treat our dead and move them back into a venerated position. We can honor our dead by visiting their graves and leaving flowers. We can light a candle as we consciously remember them in life. It is important to honor those who have gone on before as it brings death into the context of our daily experience and reminds us that dying is not the end but part of the cycle of life.

As summer turns to fall, take an afternoon to make a pilgrimage. Enlist a close family member to visit a loved one’s burial place. Take flowers and spruce up the grave. Let your thoughts return to the past and share the stories that come to mind. If you have never visited the site before, a stop at the office will help you find the plot. Active cemeteries all keep Sexton’s records and can often furnish you with a map.

Another way to connect with your ancestors is by learning their stories and keeping family records. Get your entire family involved as you track down your great-great grandfather and uncover the story of his life. Genealogy websites have made it easier to track your family’s past. Obituaries, funeral cards and other death record will list the cemetery where your relative was buried. When you discover the location of the family member’s grave, a research visit to the cemetery might provide other valuable information. Photograph the headstone or do an etching to record the information. You may find, not only birth and death dates, but other valuable facts such as a maiden name, family relationships, town of origin, and possibly a religious affiliation. Keep a printed record of your findings and share it with your family. Not only will you uncover family stories, you will strengthen the bonds of your extended family group.

If you are not into research behind a computer, you can tap into your family’s stored knowledge by asking each household to bring a photograph of a family member who has passed on to your next holiday gathering. Pass around the photos one by one as you encourage everyone to voice a memory. You will be surprised by the stories that come forward. The telling of family stories provides a link to the past as it breathes new life into someone who has been forgotten by the others creating a feeling of connectedness that goes beyond the grave.

Our ancestors are there waiting. Recognizing their presence and speaking with them allows them to live on. Through this simple acknowledgment, we give life back to those who gave life to us, allowing for a relationship that continues on through death, and for us to understand that we are a part of the natural world and that death and rebirth are all part of one continuous cycle.

Hi Lorri - could you post your article, 'Our forgotten dead' , which I have now read, as an article on the community in the normal way so that it can be bought into the editorial system. Also, could you add a brief BIO at the end for the benefit of our readers. Many thanks, Trevor

Thank you, Trevor. Yes, I will post it now and update my Bio. 

I hope all is well with you,

Lorri

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