All of us can heal.

As talented as many of us may feel we are, there are relatively few among us who are comfortable with the title of “healer.” Perhaps we sense that referring to ourselves as a healer will bring some sort of obligatory burden. Surely, seeing old images in the media, of doctors making house calls or interns training and learning to serve unselfishly by being on-call in the middle of the night, has placed some limitation on seeing healing as a personal possibility.

It is this type of conflicting image that we must overcome in order to realize that “I” am responsible for healing in my own life. CAN our lives support the idea that “little-old-untrained-me” is capable of being and doing the work of a healer? What of the idea that once we are able to heal ourselves, we might help others in turn?

From the standpoint of motherhood (well, parenthood, to be more precise) comes the concept of being a part of raising ourselves up. Parents grow children and this is no little feat on most days. Parents see, from the time their children are infants, that our role is “to help make things better.” This is precisely the role of a healer, yet we may not equate this in our work as parents.

We find creative ways to entertain our children, of molding their minds and teaching them good and healthy ways to interact with the world. We may work hard to focus their own creative energies and genius, or change our menus and diets to best suit individual needs. We can forgo our own wants and desires if it means giving more to our children and helping them see that parental service has its rewards that are not tied to the same external economy upon which so many of us rely.

Parents give all the time, or at least most do, from an unconditional position of care, concern, and love that goes beyond any roadblocks that we, or our children, may have. We coach them on to greatness in so many ways, wanting more for them than ourselves. Healing parents encourage children to strive for the positive in their efforts and actions. We let them know we support them, we heal their wounds--and when we cannot, we find the best help we can from other experts.

Successful healers may recognize the accomplishment that comes from achieving a better way of life. This greater health becomes evident in our lives, no matter the material with which we start. Even when our children are born with major differences, be they physical, mental, or emotional, we work diligently to achieve health to the point where our children are the best they can be.

Healing is timeless work, as well. We may not recognize how long it can take for someone we love to achieve a level of independence, balance, or health. It may take longer for some than others, which also adds credence to the timelessness of the natural process. We cannot rush healing along, since growth and change connect, inextricably, to nature, maturity and time.

As parents, we may feel we only have a period of approximately 18 years by which to achieve this level of maturity and health; however, it can happen sooner in some and later in others. We cannot ignore the seriousness of the healing efforts and energies we utilize. Whether we administer first aid for a small scrape, or bring forth our offspring to exhibit their fullest potential in the service of the greater good, we employ healing in ways we might not always recognize. We need to remain open to the possibilities.

In exploring possibilities, we really must look everywhere we can to find what works best. Each of us does our part to heal, whether we recognize it or not. Our planet is a big place and we humans can have such a devastating effect on our home. We need to consider healing more than our children and ourselves while we are at it. We have the larger vision of humanity itself and our planet earth, too. There is so much more at stake--there always is.

In being a healer and giving selflessly, we often include others at various times along the way, and we rarely if ever decline. There is always room for one more. We can always find ways to celebrate and share. We seek to connect--to be social and fit in as much as we can with others in ways that promote balance, healing and the flourishing of our human kind(ness).

There is no time like the “present” opportunity we have to make it “all” better.

Namaste ~ Blessings!

Kathy Custren is a mother of four, who strives for balance and has a deep respect for All. Interests include advocacy, the arts, communication, education, health, humanity's cosmic origins, nature, philosophy, spirituality and wellness. Visit her page "Consciousness Live" on Facebook, and her site at kathyc-mindblogger.blogspot.com.

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